Friday, December 08, 2006

Fry Street Plans Revealed

The developers have released the plans for the "new" Fry Street, and you can see them in this blog post from the Save Fry Street MySpace page. As you can imagine, the thing I don't care for is that the main corner of Hickory and Fry is populated by a drugstore (probably CVS, according to previous stories) instead of the Tomato (not to mention the fact that the drugstore and two proposed restaurants will have drive-thru windows, which doesn't seem to make the project very pedestrian-friendly).

There are more details in this Denton Record-Chronicle article, including a statement expressing the wish of the developers to move the Tomato to one of the buildings along the new street planned for the middle of the development, possibly with outside seating. The developers are also hoping to use reproductions of the '20s-style architecture to create a "village feel," which makes me wonder why they don't just do that by incorporating the actual old buildings into the development.

Please view the plans yourself and feel free to make comments (both here and at the MySpace, if you're a member).

Don't mess with granny: This isn't the first time we've seen a story like this. Over in Tyler, someone tried to carjack a 75-year-old woman at knifepoint while she was pumping gas. But as the assailant was leaving in her car, she opened the door and doused him with gasoline, which made it easy to identify him when the police caught up with him.

Bringing home the bacon, in a way: A Mississippi man was arrested for throwing a 60-pound pig over the counter at a Holiday Inn. Key quote: "[Police Lt.] McCaskill said there have been four late-night incidents involving animal-tossing at West Point businesses. Twice a pig was tossed and two of the incidents involved possums."

He'll never get to work the Rose Parade now: A driver in a South Carolina Christmas parade has been charged with driving a float while intoxicated.

1 comment:

Gary P. said...

The developers are also hoping to use reproductions of the '20s-style architecture to create a "village feel," which makes me wonder why they don't just do that by incorporating the actual old buildings into the development.

The same phenomenon is exhibited in Frisco where (IIRC) a bunch of old buildings were knocked down to manufacture our new historic downtown area. Apparently buildings that appear to have a history are more important than buildings that actually did have a history.... a mindset that exemplifies our fair city.

A while back the DaMN ran a series about some sort of real estate pump-and-dump scam there that has left a bunch of the townhomes in foreclosure. Looks real nice when every 3rd house in the new historic downtown area has a big FORECLOSURE sign out front.